1 ... 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 ... 70

socialist realism - Laurence senelick historical dictionary of

bet56/70
Sana04.04.2017
Hajmi5.29 Mb.

socialist realism

 became the state-approved style, TRAM was con-

demned for  

formalism

 and antirealism, overvaluing the director to 

the diminution of the actor, and was liquidated. Part of the Leningrad 

collective joined the 

Red Army Central Theatre

, and in 1938 the 

Moscow TRAM became the 

Moscow Lenin Komsomol Theatre

.

TREDIAKOVSKII,  VASILII

  

KIRILLOVICH  (1703–1769).

  Play-

wright. A poet schooled in French neoclassicism, he “became a by-

word for inspidity” (Leo Wiener). Ordered by 

Catherine the Great

 

to write plays in the style of 

Aleksandr Sumarokov

, he produced 

the tragedy Deidamia, based on an Italian opera seria. It was never 

staged. His Jason and Titus, Son of Vespasian (c.1720) were played 

only by students at the Slavo-Græco-Latin Academy, Moscow.

TRENËV, KONSTANTIN ANDREEVICH (1876–1945).

 Playwright. 

His first play, about the Emelian Pugachëv rebellion against 

Cath-

erine the Great

, was staged, with scant success, by the 

Moscow Art 

TRENËV, KONSTANTIN ANDREEVICH

  •  407


Theatre

 

(MAT)

 (MAT, 1925); critics complained that the “people’s 

hero” was depicted as ruthless. In contrast, the four-act melodrama 

Liubov' Iarovaia

, played by 

Malii Theatre

 (1926), became one of 

the  first  Soviet  hits  of  the  decade  and,  expanded  to  five  acts,  was 

revived  by  the  MAT  in  1936. A  love-versus-duty  soap  opera  of  a 

teacher torn between loyalty to her White Guard husband and loyalty 

to her Bolshevik ideals, it presented a colorful array of characters and 

pointed a politically correct moral. Played throughout the provinces, 

it earned its author 100,000 rubles a month for years. His later plays 

caused  less  of  a  stir,  even  when,  as  in  On  the  Banks  of  the  Neva 

(1937), he made 

Vladimir Lenin

 his hero or, in The General (1944), 

took Field Marshal Mikhail Kutuzov as his protagonist.

TRET'IAKOV,  SERGEI  MIKHAILOVICH

  

(1892–1939).

  Play-

wright. A member of 

Vladimir Maiakovskii

’s ultraleftist LEF move-

ment,  he  believed  that  the  artist,  to  be  a  socially  useful  producer, 

must expand the ideology of the proletariat and act on the psyche of 

the masses: emotion results from a series of shocks produced by or-

ganized stage material and the systematic introduction of aggressive 

procedures  familiar  from  melodrama  and  circus.

  

He  initiated  “the 

montage of attractions,” which 

Sergei Éizenshtein

 put in practice, 

staging Tret'iakov’s first plays at the 

Proletkul't

 

Theatre

: a multi-

media  deconstruction  of  

Aleksandr  Ostrovskii

’s  

No  Fool  Like  a 

Wise

  Fool

  (1923),  the  “

agit

-guignol”  Listening,  Moscow?  (1923), 

and the expressionistic Gas Masks (1924), put on in a Moscow gas-

works. Tret'iakov also applied this to an adaptation of Marcel Marti-

net’s revolutionary play La Nuit, staged by 

Vsevolod Meierkhol'd 

as  Earth Rampant 

(1923), a

 mass spectacle

 played before an audience 

of 25,000. Tret'iakov preached a “factographic” or documentary ap-

proach, using current events as raw material. He exploited this idea in 

Roar, China! 

(Meierkhol'd Theatre, 1926), a successful melodrama 

about  a  struggle  of  Chinese  coolies  against  British  imperialists.  I  Want a Baby

 (1926–1928), planned as a debate play about problems 

of eugenics and sexual morality, was banned. Tret'iakov was referred 

to  as  “my  teacher”  by  his  friend  Bertolt  Brecht,  whom  he  in  turn 

championed and translated into Russian. In 1937 he was arrested and 

transported to a prison camp, where he was probably shot. He was 

rehabilitated in the 1960s.

408  • 


TRET'IAKOV, SERGEI MIKHAILOVICH

TRI DEVUSHKI V GOLUBOM

.

 See THREE GIRLS IN BLUE.

TRI SESTRY.

 See THREE SISTERS

.

TROEPOLSKAIA, TAT'IANA MIKHAILOVNA (1744–1774).

 Ac-

tress. She appears to have answered an advertisement inviting women 

to join the amateur university troupe in Moscow and learn singing 

(1757). Her first recorded appearance on the St. Petersburg stage was 

in 1763, as Isabella in Jean-François Regnard’s The Menaechmi. She 

was noted for her beauty, melodious voice, and magnificent deport-

ment, blending “nobility with sensibility” (

Aleksandr

 

Sumarokov

). 

Although she played in high comedy (Célimène in The Misanthrope) 

and bourgeois drama, she was most prized by her contemporaries in 

tragedy,  especially  the  heroines  of  Sumarokov  and  watered-down 

versions of Ophelia and Juliet. Untrained, she relied on raw talent 

and instinct. She retired shortly before her death from consumption. 

Nikolai

 

Khmel'nitskii

 wrote a 

vaudeville

 about her debut.

TROFIMOV,  NIKOLAI  NIKOLAEVICH  (1920–2005).

 Actor.  He 

graduated  from  the  Ostrovskii  Theatre  Institute  in  Leningrad  in 

1941. Badly wounded during the war, he was demobilized in 1944 

and started acting at the Red Flag Baltic Naval Theatre in Tallinn. 

He moved to the 

Leningrad State Comedy

 

Theatre

 under 

Nikolai 

Akimov

; there he became a master of improvisational comedy. At 

the 

Bol'shoi Dramatic Theatre

 

(BDT)

 from 1964, he contributed to 

the ensemble in 

Georgii Tovstonogov

’s productions, usually in roles 

of  old  men:  Pickwick  (The  Pickwick  Club),  Raspliuev  (

Tarelkin’s 

Death

),  Perchikhin  (

The  Petty

  Bourgeoisie

),  Silence  (Henry  IV), 

Chebutykin (

Three Sisters

), and Giles Corey (The Crucible).

TRUSHKIN,  LEONID

  

GRIGOR'EVICH

  

(1951–  ).

  Director.  He 

studied at 

Shchukin

 Theatre School and acted in Moscow, Lenin-

grad, and the provinces for 15 years, including as Treplëv (

Seagull

Maiakovskii Theatre

, 1979). In 1986 he enrolled in the directing 

program at 

GITIS

, studying with 

Anatolii Éfros

, whose 

Taganka 

Cherry  Orchard

  deeply  influenced  him.  Trushkin  founded  the 

Anton  Chekhov  Theatre

,  Moscow  (1989),  a  private  enterprise 

backed by friends who had made their fortunes in the first blush of 

TRUSHKIN, LEONID GRIGOR'EVICH

  •  409

perestroika.

 Even after raising prices, he thrived on sold-out houses. 

Eschewing traditional ideas of the theatre as education or politics, 

he provides slick, well-crafted entertainment, with such hits as The 

Jerks’ Dinner

 (1998), 

Aleksandr Galin

’s Delusion, and Los Ange-

les playwright Richard Baer’s Mixed Emotions, which have toured 

Eastern Europe.

TRUZZI, VIL'IAMS

 

ZHIZHETTOVICH

 

(1888–1931).

 Circus art-

ist. Grandson and son of Italian circus managers who settled in Rus-

sia, he was a child equestrian and in the 1920s became director of the 

State circuses. He was noted for his elegant choreography of horses 

and  his  pantomimes,  revising  traditional  routines.  His  Thousand 

and  One  Nights

 was admired for its lavish orientalism (1922). His 

last production was Makhno’s Gang (1930), a new type of spectacle 

based on the recent events.

TSAR FEODOR

 

(Tsar' Feodor Ioannovich

).

 Historical play by 

Alek-

sei K. Tolstoi

 (1864). Feodor, heir of Ivan the Terrible, is a spiritually 

pure,  kind-hearted  man,  incapable  of  ruling  with  a  firm  hand,  not 

unlike Shakespeare’s Henry VI. His wife Irina, his adviser Boris Go-

dunov, and boyars of various factions drive him from one position to 

another, balanced always on the point of abdicating, while the people 

seethe under his feeble sway. The second play of a blank-verse tril-

ogy, which included The Death of Ioann the Terrible and Tsar Boris, 

it was forbidden the stage for 30 years. However, Tolstoi laid out in 

detail in the introduction a potential production plan. In 1898 

Aleksei 

Suvorin

 used his government connections to put on the play at his 

Literary-Artistic  Society  Theatre

,  St.  Petersburg,  in  1898;  

Pavel 

Orlenev

’s Feodor was a veiled characterization of Nicholas II. Two 

days  later,  the  

Moscow Art Theatre  (MAT)

  opened  with  its  own 

colorfully antiquarian production, with 

Ivan Moskvin

 as a sympa-

thetic Feodor. This production, with its rich costumes, choral sing-

ing, and picturesque groupings, remained a showpiece for the MAT 

for decades. The critic Burenin wrote that “Orlenev’s Feodor is all 

nerves, Moskvin’s Feodor is all flesh, and 

Boris Glagolin

’s Feodor 

is all spirit.”

TSAR' FEODOR IOANNOVICH.

 See TSAR FEODOR

.

410  • 

TRUZZI, VIL'IAMS ZHIZHETTOVICH

TSAR MAXIMILIAN

 

(Tsar' Maksimil'ian

).

 Folk play that portrays a 

heathen king putting to death his obdurate Christian (or in some ver-

sions, pirate chief) son. It exists in numerous variants with alternative 

episodes  and  contains  elements  recurrent  in  European  folk  drama: 

heroic combat between champions (a black Arab, the warrior Anika, 

Sir Barmuil), a losing battle with the Grim Reaper, comic resurrec-

tions by a quack doctor, and punning interludes with grave diggers. 

It has recently been shown to be an adaptation of a school play, first 

performed in 1704, and may be a satiric comment on the relations 

of

 Peter the Great

 and his son Aleksei. By the 1860s it was being 

annually staged by groups of military people, factory workers, and 

peasants  throughout  Russia.  

Nikolai  Evreinov

  saw  a  performance 

in 1911. In the Silver Age 

Aleksei Remizov

 created a sophisticated 

version  based  on  19  variants,  staged  in  1921  by  the  Khamsovet 

Theatre in faux-naïf style with robes of canvas and an old armchair 

for a throne. This adaptation was revived by 

Boris Morozov

 at the 

Ermolova Theatre

 Center (2000). The play also served as the basis 

for the libretto by Elena Polenova to Tsar Demian, an opera by five 

composers “compiled” by Pëtr Pospelov (

Maria Theatre

, St. Peters-

burg, 2002).

TSARËV,  MIKHAIL  IVANOVICH  (1903–1987).

 Actor, director. A 

disciple of 

Iur'ii Iur'ev

, he entered the 

Bol'shoi Dramatic Theatre

 

(BDT)

 in 1920 as romantic heroes and in character roles. In 1923, 

at the Vasileostrov Theatre, he first played Chatskii (

Woe from Wit

)

a character he continued to refine for over 30 years. After work in 

many  theatres  (

Korsh’s

,  1924–1926;  with  

Nikolai  Sinel'nikov

1926–1927),  while  acting  in  a  Leningrad  revival  of  Dom  Juan  in 

1932 he met 

Vsevolod Meierkhol'd

, who enrolled him in his the-

atre (1933–1937) as Armand Duval (The Lady of the Camelias) and 

Chatskii (Woe to Wit). At the 

Malii

 from 1937, becoming its artistic 

director in 1985, he lent his laconic presence to Famusov (Woe from 

Wit

),  as  well  as  Arbenin  (

Masquerade

),  Macbeth,  Ivanov,  Fedia 

Protasov (

The Living

 

Corpse

), and Higgins (Pygmalion), rarely ap-

pearing in modern drama.

TSCHECHOWA,  OLGA.  

See 

CHEKHOVA, OL'GA KONSTANTI-

NOVNA.

TSCHECHOWA, OLGA

  •  411

TSEMAKH,  NAUM  LAZAREVICH  (Nahum  Zemach,  1887–

1939).

  Jewish  actor,  director.  From  1909  to  1917  he  acted  in  an 

amateur  troupe  that  played  in  Hebrew  in  Poland,  Lithuania,  and 

Austria.  In  1918  he  founded  and  headed  

Habima

,  in  Moscow. A 

highly romantic actor, he played the Prophet (The Eternal Jew) and 

the  Tsaddik  (The  Dybbuk,  1922).  In  1926–1928  he  toured  abroad 

with Habima, settling in the United States, where he directed in the 

Yiddish theatre.

TSERETELLI,  NIKOLAI  MIKHAILOVICH  (1890–1942).

 Actor, 


director. After  playing  in  Germany,  straight  from  acting  school  at 

the invitation of Max Reinhardt, he joined the 

Moscow Art Theatre 

(MAT)

 in walk-on parts (1913–1915). While 

Vladimir Nemirovich-

Danchenko

 was considering him for the Player King in Hamlet, he 

became a star at the 

Kamernii Theatre

 in the title role of Thamyris  the Cithaerist 

(1916). There, partnered with 

Alisa Koonen

, the tall, 

angular aesthete played a high-strung Iokanaan (Salome), Harlequin 

(Columbine’s Scarf), Maurice de Saxe (Adrienne Lecouvreur), Ro-

meo, Hippolite (Phédre), Maraschin (Giroflé-Girofla), Hæmon (An- tigone

), and Eben (Desire under the Elms).

 

He was an embodiment 

of the all-purpose modernist virtuoso, capable of singing, dancing, or 

declaiming tragedy. He left the company in 1928 to direct at musical 

theatres  in  Moscow,  then  in  the  provinces  (1934–1940)  and  at  the 

Leningrad State Comedy Theatre

 (1940–1942).

TSULUKIDZE, TAMARA GRIGOR'EVNA (1903– ).

 Georgian ac-

tress. While she was a member of the 

Rustaveli

 troupe (1927–1936), 

her acting in both drama and comedy was distinguished by refined 

form and strong emotion. Her roles included Iltani (Zagmuk), Amalia 

(The Robbers), Kseniia (The Breakup), and the title role in Lamara. 

In 1936 she was illegally repressed and not rehabilitated until 1956. 

On  her  return  to  the  Rustaveli,  she  played  Mariia  Aleksandrovna 

Ul'ianova (Family). Her memoir Just One Life was the first revelation 

of how 

Sandro Akhmeteli

 had been liquidated.

TSVETAEVA, MARINA IVANOVNA (1892–1941).

 Playwright. Her 

tragic life (poverty, exile from 1922 to 1939, suicide on return to the 

USSR) is transcended by her poetry. Her verse plays are inscribed 

412  • 

TSEMAKH, NAUM LAZAREVICH



in the 

Aleksandr Pushkin

 and

 Aleksandr Blok

 traditions but also 

are influenced by Alfred de Musset and Edmond Rostand. None of 

the six plays of her love cycle (1917–1919) were composed when 

she was an intimate of 

Evgenii Vakhtangov

 and the 

Moscow Art 

Theatre (MAT)

 

Third Studio

. Her adaptations of classical tragedy 

Ariadne

  (1927)  and  Phaedra  (1928)  were  written  in  Prague  and 

Paris,  respectively.  Also  in  Paris,  she  wrote  romantic  treatments 

of  18th-century  France:  Casanova’s  End  (1919,  published  1922), 

its  expanded  three-act  version  Phoenix  (published  1924),  Adven- ture 

(published Prague, 1923), and Fortune (published 1923). Her 

theatre of dream and adventure, drawing on legends and folklore, 

is  woven  out  of  verbal  tension,  echoes,  sound  contrasts.  Growing 

critical toward an art allied to the visible, the real that “nails the poet 

to the pillory,” she turned away from the theatre in the late 1920s. 

Phaedra

 had its premiere in Moscow (directed by

 Roman Viktiuk

1988, with 

Alla Demidova

); Phoenix was created in Berlin by Klaus 

Michael Gruber (1990); Adventure was first staged by Ivan Popovski 

in Moscow (1991).

TUMANISHVILI, MIKHAIL IVANOVICH (1921–1995).

 Georgian 

director. In the 1960s, at the  

Rustaveli Drama Theatre

, he intro-

duced new modes of working with actors and more poetic scripts. 

His production of Jean Anouilh’s Antigone spoke to freedom of the 

individual.  He  taught  

Robert  Sturua  

and  created  a  several  studio 

theatres, including the Theatre of Film Actors, whose ungimmicky  Midsummer Night’s Dream

 (1994) toured widely.

TUMANOV, IOSIF MIKHAILOVICH (Tumanishvili, 1909–1981).

 

Georgian  director.  He  studied  with  

Iurii  Zavadskii

  (1925–1932), 

playing leading roles at his theatre, and was named chief director at

 

Stanislavskii 

Opera Theatre, specializing in operetta (1936–1946). 

Tumanov directed at many Moscow theatres, including the 

Pushkin

 

(1953–1961),  where  his  work  included  a  dramatization  of  Charles 

Dickens’s  Little  Dorrit  (1953)  and  Ewan  McColl’s  The Train  Can  Stop

 (1954). In 1961 he became chief director of the massive Palace 

of Congresses in the Kremlin, where his opera productions were dis-

tinguished by their enormous scale. In 1980 he organized the opening 

and closing ceremonies of the Moscow Olympics.

TUMANOV, IOSIF MIKHAILOVICH

  •  413

TUMINIS, RIMAS (1952– ).

 Lithuanian director. A graduate of

 GITIS

 

(1978), he worked at the Lithuanian Academic Dramatic Theatre in 

Vilnius (1979–1990), staging works by Tennessee Williams, Heiner 

Müller, Athol Fugard, making a real stir with his own play (with V. 

Kukulas) There Shall Be No Death (1988). Fed up with the conser-

vatism of the administration, he founded the State Little Theatre of 

Vilnius (1990–1994), opening with a prize-winning 

Cherry Orchard

 

(1990). With the departure of the controversial Jonas Vaitkus from 

the Academic Theatre, Tuminis returned there as chief director, be-

coming general director when the name changed to the Lithuanian 

National Dramatic Theatre in 1998 and dividing his time between it 

and the Little Theatre. His low-keyed, mildly Brechtian productions 

include The Life of Galileo (1992), the Jewish-themed Smile Upon 

Us

, Lord (1994), 

Masquerade

 (1997), 

The Inspector

 

(2001), Waiting 

for Godot

 (2002), and Madagascar (2004). He also staged We Play 

Schiller

 at the 

Sovremennik 

(2000).

TUPTALO, DMITRII.

 See 

DEMETRIUS OF ROSTOV.

TURCHANINOVA, EVDOKIIA

 

DMITRIEVNA (1870–1963).

 Ac-

tress.  A  student  of  

Aleksandr  Lenskii

,  she  entered  the  

Malii

  in 

1891, in ingenue and “breeches” roles but soon was playing comic 

old women and “hawk-eyed spectacular dowagers” (Kenneth Tynan). 

Between 1898 and 1907 she appeared as well at the 

New Theatre

in such parts as the Mayor’s wife (

The Inspector

). Song and dance 

enlivened  her  performances,  and  she  found  the  appropriate  speech 

rhythm for each of her characters. Restrained in gesture, she excelled 

in the Russian classics. She officially retired in 1959 but made oc-

casional appearances to 1961.

TURGENEV,  IVAN  SERGEEVICH  (1818–1883).

  Playwright. 

Known for his novels and short stories, he wrote plays primarily 

for specific actors; their strongest aspect is dialogue between two 

characters. His first dramatic effort, Indiscretion, written while at 

the university in Berlin and influenced by Prosper Mérimée, was a 

swashbuckling melodrama set in Spain. His second, Penniless, or,  Scenes  from  the  Life  of  a Young  Nobleman

, owed a clear debt to 

Nikolai  Gogol'

. Between 1843 and 1852 he composed a number 

414  • 

TUMINIS, RIMAS



of  distinctive  plays,  based  in  part  on Alfred  de  Musset’s  prover- bes

,  including  Thin  Ice  (1847);  The  Charity  Case  (1848,  written 

for 

Mikhail Shchepkin

 but banned for the capitals by the 

censor

because it mentioned a noblewoman’s adultery; Shchepkin played 

it on tour, but it was first produced in St. Petersburg in 1861); The  Bachelor

 (1849, written for Shchepkin to make up for the censored 

play); and An Evening in Sorrento (1852). Turgenev also continued 

writing successful farces, such as Luncheon with the Marshal of No-

bility 

(1849), Conversation on the Highway (1850), and The Lady 

from the Provinces

 (1850). His best known play outside Russia is 

his masterpiece

 A Month in the Country

 (1849). The

 censor 

kept 

it off the boards until 1872. Psychologically acute, it is an examina-

tion of the limits of human freedom within social norms. Turgenev 

attached  little  importance  to  his  dramas  and,  weary  of  locking 

horns with the censorship, wrote no more plays. He objected to the 

petty details in 

Aleksandr Ostrovskii

’s character drawing. In his 

later years, he conducted a correspondence with the actress 

Mariia 

Savina

, who created Vera in A Month in the Country. He was first 

lauded as a dramatist by the critic Leonid Grossman, who cited him 

as a forerunner of 

Anton Chekhov

, a comparison that has turned 

into  a  cliché,  regrettable  because  it  undervalues  Turgenev’s  own 

idiosyncratic qualities.


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


sevgili-renciler-benim-9.html

sevgili-renciler-size-5.html

sevginin-dad-roman---shif-100.html

sevginin-dad-roman---shif-105.html

sevginin-dad-roman---shif-11.html